All about China

78 element(s) found

Document(s)

Note verbale dated 13 September 2019 from the Permanent Representative of Egypt to the United Nations addressed to the Secretary-General

By United Nations, on 15 October 2020


2020

United Nations report

Bahrain

Bangladesh

Botswana

Brunei Darussalam

Chad

China

Democratic People's Republic of Korea

Egypt

Ethiopia

Grenada

Iran (Islamic Republic of)

Iraq

Jamaica

Kuwait

Libya

Moratorium

Nigeria

Oman

Pakistan

Papua New Guinea

Qatar

Saint Kitts and Nevis

Saint Lucia

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Saudi Arabia

Singapore

Sudan

Syrian Arab Republic

United Arab Emirates

Yemen

Zimbabwe

aresfrruzh-hant
More details See the document

The Permanent Missions to the United Nations inNew York listed below have the honour to refer to General Assembly resolution 73/175, entitled “Moratorium on the use of the death penalty”, which was adopted by the Assembly on 17 December 2018 by a recorded vote. The Permanent Missions wish to place on record that they are in persistent objection to any attempt to impose a moratorium on the use of the death penalty or its abolition in contravention of existing stipulations under international law, for the following reasons:

Document(s)

China’s deadly secret

By Amnesty International, on 8 September 2020


2020

NGO report

China

zh-hant
More details See the document

The Chinese government continues to conceal the extent to which capital punishment is being used in China, despite more than four decades of requests from UN bodies and the international community and despite the Chinese authorities’ own pledges to bring about increased openness in the country’s criminal justice system. This report focuses on the extent to which the authorities maintain near absolute secrecy over the death penalty system, while using partial and generally unverifiable disclosures to claim progress and reject demands for greater transparency.

  • Document type NGO report
  • Countries list China
  • Themes list Drug Offences, Death Penalty, Statistics, Country/Regional profiles,
  • Available languages 中国的致命秘密

Document(s)

Note verbale dated 28 July 2015 from the Permanent Mission of Egypt to the United Nations addressed to the Secretary-General

By United Nations, on 8 September 2020


United Nations report

Antigua and Barbuda

Bangladesh

Botswana

Brunei Darussalam

China

Democratic People's Republic of Korea

Egypt

Ethiopia

Guyana

Iran (Islamic Republic of)

Iraq

Jamaica

Kuwait

Libya

Malaysia

Moratorium

Nigeria

Oman

Pakistan

Qatar

Saudi Arabia

Singapore

Sudan

Syrian Arab Republic

Trinidad and Tobago

United Arab Emirates

Yemen

Zimbabwe

aresfrruzh-hant
More details See the document

The permanent missions to the United Nations in New York listed below have the honour to refer to General Assembly resolution 69/186, entitled “Moratorium on the use of the death penalty”, which was adopted by the Third Committee on 21 November 2014 and subsequently by the General Assembly on 18 December 2014 by a recorded vote. The permanent missions wish to place on record that they are in persistent objection to any attempt to impose a moratorium on the use of the death penalty or its abolition in contravention of existing stipulations under international law, for the following reasons:

Document(s)

Greek : НОВЫЕ ТЕНДЕНЦИИ РАЗВИТИЯ УГОЛОВНОГО ЗАКОНОДАТЕЛЬСТВА В КИТАЕ

By Пан Дунмэй / Институт изучения России Хэйлунцзянского университета, on 8 September 2020


Article

China


More details See the document

Бурное социально-экономическое развитие КНР в последние годы обусловило изменения, произошедшие в современном китайском обществе, что, в свою очередь, повлекло необходи- мость изменения уголовного законодательства Китая.

  • Document type Article
  • Countries list China
  • Themes list International law,

Document(s)

Note verbale dated 16 April 2013 from the Permanent Mission of Egypt to the United Nations addressed to the Secretary-General

By United Nations, on 8 September 2020


United Nations report

Afghanistan

Antigua and Barbuda

Bahrain

Bangladesh

Barbados

Botswana

Brunei Darussalam

Chad

China

Democratic People's Republic of Korea

Egypt

Equatorial Guinea

Eritrea

Eswatini

Ethiopia

Grenada

Guyana

India

Iran (Islamic Republic of)

Iraq

Jamaica

Kuwait

Lao People's Democratic Republic

Libya

Malaysia

Mauritania

Moratorium

Myanmar

Nigeria

Oman

Pakistan

Papua New Guinea

Qatar

Saint Kitts and Nevis

Saint Lucia

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Saudi Arabia

Singapore

Solomon Islands

Somalia

Sudan

Syrian Arab Republic

Tonga

Trinidad and Tobago

Uganda

United Arab Emirates

Yemen

Zimbabwe

aresfrruzh-hant
More details See the document

The permanent missions to the United Nations in New York listed below have the honour to refer to General Assembly resolution 67/176, entitled “Moratorium on the use of the death penalty”, which was adopted by the Third Committee on 19 November 2012, and subsequently by the General Assembly on 20 December 2012 by a recorded vote. The permanent missions wish to place on record that they are in persistent objection to any attempt to impose a moratorium on the use of the death penalty or its abolition in contravention of existing stipulations under international law, for the following reasons:

Document(s)

Note verbale dated 11 March 2011 from the Permanent Mission of Egypt to the United Nations addressed to the Secretary-General

By United Nations, on 8 September 2020


United Nations report

Afghanistan

Antigua and Barbuda

Bahamas

Bahrain

Bangladesh

Barbados

Botswana

Brunei Darussalam

Central African Republic

Chad

China

Democratic People's Republic of Korea

Democratic Republic of the Congo

Dominica

Egypt

Equatorial Guinea

Eritrea

Eswatini

Ethiopia

Grenada

Guinea

Guyana

Indonesia

Iran (Islamic Republic of)

Iraq

Jamaica

Kuwait

Lao People's Democratic Republic

Libya

Malaysia

Moratorium

Myanmar

Niger

Nigeria

Oman

Pakistan

Papua New Guinea

Qatar

Saint Kitts and Nevis

Saint Lucia

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Saudi Arabia

Sierra Leone

Singapore

Solomon Islands

Somalia

Sudan

Syrian Arab Republic

Tonga

Trinidad and Tobago

Uganda

United Arab Emirates

Yemen

Zimbabwe

aresfrruzh-hant
More details See the document

The permanent missions to the United Nations in New York listed below have the honour to refer to General Assembly resolution 65/206, entitled “Moratorium on the use of the death penalty”, which was adopted by the Third Committee on 11 November 2010, and subsequently by the General Assembly on 21 December 2010 by a recorded vote. The permanent missions wish to place on record that they are in persistent objection to any attempt to impose a moratorium on the use of the death penalty or its abolition in contravention of existing stipulations under international law, for the following reasons:

Document(s)

Note verbale dated 10 February 2009 from the Permanent Missions to the United Nations of Afghanistan, the Bahamas, […] and Zimbabwe addressed to the Secretary-General

By United Nations, on 8 September 2020


United Nations report

Afghanistan

Bahamas

Bahrain

Bangladesh

Barbados

Botswana

Brunei Darussalam

Central African Republic

Chad

China

Comoros

Democratic People's Republic of Korea

Dominica

Egypt

Equatorial Guinea

Eritrea

Eswatini

Ethiopia

Fiji

Gambia

Grenada

Guinea

Guyana

Indonesia

Iran (Islamic Republic of)

Iraq

Jamaica

Japan

Jordan

Kuwait

Lao People's Democratic Republic

Libya

Malaysia

Maldives

Mauritania

Mongolia

Moratorium

Myanmar

Niger

Nigeria

Papua New Guinea

Qatar

Saint Kitts and Nevis

Saint Lucia

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Saudi Arabia

Singapore

Solomon Islands

Somalia

Sudan

Suriname

Syrian Arab Republic

Thailand

Tonga

Trinidad and Tobago

Uganda

United Arab Emirates

Yemen

Zimbabwe

aresfrruzh-hant
More details See the document

The Permanent Missions to the United Nations in New York listed below present their compliments to the Secretary-General of the United Nations and have the honour to refer to resolution 62/149, entitled “Moratorium on the use of the death penalty”, which was adopted by the Third Committee on 15 November 2007, and subsequently by the General Assembly on 18 December 2007 by a recorded vote. The Permanent Missions wish to place on record that they are in persistent objection to any attempt to impose a moratorium on the use of the death penalty or its abolition in contravention to existing stipulations under international law, for the following reasons:

Document(s)

China’s death penalty: reforms on capital punishment

By Hong Lu / East Asian Institute (EAI), on 8 September 2020


Article

China


More details See the document

This paper covers the death penalty situation in China, which is, according to the author, unlikely to abolish the death penalty in the near future. China topped the world in the imposition of the death penalty in 2008, while wrongful convictions and erroneous executions have been found, despite China’s official policy to prevent excessive executions.

  • Document type Article
  • Countries list China
  • Themes list Juveniles, Capital offences, Legal Representation, Statistics, Country/Regional profiles,

Document(s)

Note verbale dated 11 January 2008 from the Permanent Missions to the United Nations of Afghanistan, Antigua and Barbuda, […] and Zimbabwe addressed to the Secretary-General

By United Nations, on 8 September 2020


United Nations report

Afghanistan

Antigua and Barbuda

Bahamas

Bahrain

Bangladesh

Barbados

Botswana

Brunei Darussalam

Central African Republic

China

Comoros

Democratic People's Republic of Korea

Dominica

Egypt

Equatorial Guinea

Eritrea

Eswatini

Ethiopia

Fiji

Grenada

Guinea

Guyana

Indonesia

Iran (Islamic Republic of)

Iraq

Jamaica

Japan

Jordan

Kuwait

Lao People's Democratic Republic

Libya

Malaysia

Maldives

Mauritania

Mongolia

Moratorium

Myanmar

Nigeria

Oman

Pakistan

Papua New Guinea

Qatar

Saint Kitts and Nevis

Saint Lucia

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Saudi Arabia

Singapore

Solomon Islands

Somalia

Sudan

Suriname

Syrian Arab Republic

Thailand

Tonga

Trinidad and Tobago

Uganda

United Arab Emirates

Yemen

Zimbabwe

aresfrruzh-hant
More details See the document

The Permanent Missions to the United Nations in New York listed below present their compliments to the Secretary-General of the United Nations and have the honour to refer to resolution 62/149, entitled “Moratorium on the use of the death penalty”, which was adopted by the Third Committee on 15 November 2007, and subsequently by the General Assembly on 18 December 2007 by a recorded vote. The Permanent Missions wish to place on record that they are in persistent objection to any attempt to impose a moratorium on the use of the death penalty or its abolition in contravention to existing stipulations under international law, for the following reasons:

Document(s)

State Secrets: China’s Legal Labyrinth

By Andrew Nathan / ChristineLoh / Liu Baopu / Fu Hualing / Jerome A. Cohen / Human Rights In China, on 8 September 2020


NGO report

China


More details See the document

This report describes and examines the PRC state secrets system and shows how itallows and even promotes human rights violations by undermining the rights tofreedom of expression and information. The PRC state secrets system, implementedthrough a CPC-controlled hierarchy of government bodies, is comprised of statesecrets laws and regulations that work in tandem with the PRC’s state security,criminal procedure and criminal laws, to create a complex, opaque system that controlsthe classification of—and criminalizes the disclosure or possession of—statesecrets. By guarding too much information and sweeping a vast universe of informationinto the state secrets net, the complex and opaque state secrets system perpetuatesa culture of secrecy that is not only harmful but deadly to Chinese society

  • Document type NGO report
  • Countries list China
  • Themes list Transparency,

Document(s)

Report of the Special Rapporteur on torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, Manfred Nowak – MISSION TO CHINA

By United Nations / Manfred Nowak, on 8 September 2020


NGO report

China

frzh-hantesarru
More details See the document

The Special Rapporteur also observes positive developments at the legislative level, including the planned reform of several laws relevant to the criminal procedure, which he hopes will bring Chinese legislation into greater conformity with international norms, particularly the fair trial standards contained in the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) which China signed in 1998 and is preparing to ratify. He also welcomes the resumption by the Supreme People’s Court (SPC) of its authority to review all death penalty cases,59 particularly given the fact that the quality of the judiciary increases as one ascends the hierarchy. The Special Rapporteur suggests that China might use the opportunity of this important event to increase transparency regarding the number of death sentences in the country, as well as to consider legislation that would allow direct petitioning to the SPC in cases where individuals do not feel that they were provided with adequate relief by lower courts in cases involving the useof torture, access to counsel, etc.

Document(s)

People’s Republic of China: Executed “according to law”? The death penalty in China

By Amnesty International, on 8 September 2020


NGO report

China

fr
More details See the document

This document describes the process that someone suspected of committing a capital crime goes through under the Chinese criminal justice system, from detention through to execution. This process will be described using examples of cases researched by Amnesty International, and others monitored in the official press in China. As shown, there is potential for the violation of human rights at every stage of the criminal justice process leading to execution.

Document(s)

THE PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA – The Death Penalty in 2000

By Amnesty International, on 8 September 2020


NGO report

China


More details See the document

The attached report analyses the use of the death penalty in China in 2000 and examines sentencing patterns and the legislation behind the death penalty in China.

  • Document type NGO report
  • Countries list China
  • Themes list Networks, Statistics,

Document(s)

People’s Republic of China: The Death Penalty Log in 2000

By Amnesty International, on 8 September 2020


NGO report

China


More details See the document

The Death Penalty Log gives available details of death sentences and executions occurring in China throughout 2000.

  • Document type NGO report
  • Countries list China
  • Themes list Statistics,

Document(s)

People’s Republic of China: The Death Penalty in 1999

By Amnesty International, on 8 September 2020


NGO report

China

fr
More details See the document

This report analyses the use of the death penalty in China and examines sentencing patterns and the legislation behind the death penalty.

Document(s)

Respect for Minimum Standards? Report on the Death Penalty in China

on 1 January 2020


2020

NGO report

China


More details See the document
  • Document type NGO report
  • Countries list China

Article(s)

3+4: Death Penalty Cases Now Jury Cases

By Nicolas Chua, on 23 November 2018

On 24 April 2018, ‘The People’s Jury Law’ established a new judicial framework to deal with serious criminal cases, including death penalty cases. As of its enactment, death penalty cases in China are now jury cases.

2018

China

Article(s)

Day of the Endangered Lawyer: spotlight on China

By Emmanuel Trépied, on 14 February 2017

24 January 2017 was the Day of the Endangered Lawyer. This international initiative was dedicated to the harassment undergone by Chinese lawyers.

2017

China

Cruel, Inhuman and Degrading Treatment and Punishment

Legal Representation

Document(s)

Note verbale dated 7 September 2017 from the Permanent Mission of Egypt to the United Nations addressed to the Secretary-General

By United Nations, on 1 January 2017


2017

United Nations report

Antigua and Barbuda

Bangladesh

Barbados

Botswana

Brunei Darussalam

Chad

China

Democratic People's Republic of Korea

Egypt

Ethiopia

Grenada

Iran (Islamic Republic of)

Iraq

Jamaica

Kuwait

Libya

Malaysia

Maldives

Moratorium

Nigeria

Oman

Pakistan

Papua New Guinea

Saint Kitts and Nevis

Saint Lucia

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Saudi Arabia

Singapore

Sudan

Syrian Arab Republic

United Arab Emirates

Yemen

Zimbabwe

aresfrruzh-hant
More details See the document

The Permanent Missions to the United Nations in New York listed below have the honour to refer to General Assembly resolution 71/187, entitled “Moratorium on the use of the death penalty”, which was adopted by the Third Committee on 17November 2016 and subsequently by the Assembly on 19 December 2016 by a recorded vote. The Permanent Missions wish to place on record that they are in persistent objection to any attemptto impose a moratorium on the use of the death penalty or its abolition in contravention of existing stipulations under international law, for the following reasons:

Article(s)

The death penalty for drugs must go, it has no place in a civilised society

By Aurélie Plaçais, on 21 October 2015

Those were the words of Anand Grover, former UN Special Rapporteur on the right to health during the opening ceremony of Harm Reduction International’s 24th conference in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

2015

China

Drug Offenses

India

Indonesia

Malaysia

Article(s)

Imposing the death penalty has not reduced drug crimes in Asia -New Report

By FIDH & World Coalition, on 10 October 2015

Death penalty for drug crimes in Asia: an illegal practice reveals report published on World Day by FIDH and the World Coalition

2015

Afghanistan

Bangladesh

China

Democratic People's Republic of Korea

Drug Offenses

India

Indonesia

Iran (Islamic Republic of)

Japan

Lao People's Democratic Republic

Malaysia

Maldives

Myanmar

Pakistan

Republic of Korea

Singapore

Sri Lanka

Taiwan

Thailand

Viet Nam

Article(s)

China reduces the number of crimes punishable by death to 46, but keeps drug trafficking in the list

By Aurélie Plaçais, on 7 October 2015

China removes nine non-violent and rarely used criminal offenses from capital punishment.

2015

China

Drug Offenses

Article(s)

ADPAN network strengthens abolitionists across Asia

By Aurélie Plaçais (in Taipei, Taiwan), on 9 December 2014

The Anti-Death Penalty Asia Network, a coalition hosted by Amnesty International in London since 2006, has become an independent organisation registered in Malaysia and held its first AGM in Taipei, Taiwan on 4-5 December.

2014

China

Japan

Malaysia

Mongolia

Public Opinion 

Republic of Korea

Taiwan

Taiwan

Article(s)

China’s “efforts to gradually reduce the application of the death penalty”

By Aurélie Plaçais, on 30 October 2014

Following a decision by the Communist Party’s Central Committee in November 2013 to “gradually reduce the number of crimes punishable by death”, a draft amendment to China’s criminal law was submitted for initial review to the country’s National People’s Congress this week.

2014

China

Article(s)

China rejects all UN recommendations on death penalty use

By Aurélie Plaçais, on 24 March 2014

“China’s position is to retain the death penalty, but strictly and prudently limit its application according to law,” said the world’s top executioner after it rejected all 20 UPR recommendations to curb capital punishment.

2014

China

Document(s)

China Executed 2,400 People in 2013, Dui Hua

By Dui Hua Human Rights Journal, on 1 January 2014


2014

Article

China


More details See the document

The Dui Hua Foundation estimates that China executed approximately 2,400 people in 2013 and will execute roughly the same number of people in 2014. Annual declines in executions recorded in recent years are likely to be offset in 2014 by the use of capital punishment in anti-terrorism campaigns in Xinjiang and the anti-corruption campaign nationwide.

  • Document type Article
  • Countries list China
  • Themes list Statistics,

Article(s)

Lawyers’ manual published in traditional Chinese

By Taiwan Alliance to End the Death Penalty, on 30 November 2013

On the occasion of Cities for Life Day on November 30, the Taiwan Alliance to End the Death Penalty (TAEDP) and the World Coalition Against the Death Penalty are proud to announce the online publication of the Chinese version of Representing Individuals Facing the Death Penalty: A Best Practices Manual. This publication is intended for lawyers who defend people facing the death penalty around the world.

2013

China

Legal Representation

Taiwan

Taiwan

Article(s)

How far is China ready to reduce its use of the death penalty?

By Aurélie Plaçais, on 25 November 2013

The number one executioner in the world recently made national and international commitments to continuing to reform its death penalty, but how far is China really ready to go?

2013

China

Clemency

Drug Offenses

Terrorism

Article(s)

Moving away from the death penalty in Asia

By Sandra Babcock (DeathPenaltyWorldwide.org) in Bangkok, on 25 October 2013

Following up on the World Day Against the Death Penalty, successive meetings in Thailand and in China highlight decreasing support for capital punishment among Asian governments and public opinion.

2013

Brunei Darussalam

China

Japan

Lao People's Democratic Republic

Moratorium

Myanmar

Public Opinion 

Thailand

Article(s)

Chinese lawyers hailed as “heroes for justice”

By Aurélie Plaçais, on 22 June 2013

The role of lawyers in the fight against the death penalty has been discussed from different angles throughout the 5th World Congress, but the testimony of Chinese lawyers caught most people’s attention.

2013

China

Fair Trial

Legal Representation

Article(s)

Only one in 10 countries carried out executions in 2012

By Tiziana Trotta, on 10 April 2013

At least 682 people were executed last year aside from China, according to Amnesty International.

2013

Afghanistan

Bahrain

Barbados

Belarus

Burkina Faso

China

Death Row Conditions 

Democratic People's Republic of Korea

Egypt

Gambia

Ghana

Guyana

India

Iran (Islamic Republic of)

Iraq

Malawi

Moratorium

Pakistan

Saudi Arabia

Sierra Leone

Singapore

Syrian Arab Republic

Taiwan

Trinidad and Tobago

Viet Nam

Yemen

Document(s)

China’s Death Penalty: The Supreme People’s Court, the Suspended Death Sentence and the Politics of Penal Reform

By Susan Trevaskes / British Journal of Criminology, on 1 January 2013


2013

Article

China


More details See the document

This paper examines the issue of judicial discretion and the role of the Supreme People’s Court (SPC) in death penalty reform since 2007. The SPC has been encouraging judges to give ‘suspended’ death sentences rather than ‘immediate execution’ for some homicide cases. Lower court judges are encouraged to use their discretion to recognize mitigating circumstances that would allow them to sentence offenders to a suspended death sentence. The SPC has used ‘guidance’ instruments which include ‘directives’ and other SPC interpretations and a new ‘case guidance’ system which provides case exemplars to follow. The study explored these guidance instruments as a way of deepening the understanding of how law, politics and judicial practices are interwoven to achieve reform goals.

  • Document type Article
  • Countries list China
  • Themes list Death Penalty, Country/Regional profiles,

Article(s)

Building a death penalty-free future in Asia

By Aurélie Plaçais, on 6 December 2012

Ways to strengthen transregional action led by Asian activists and ideas to combat obstruction from national authorities were among the issues discussed at the third ADPAN consultative meeting.

2012

Australia

Bangladesh

China

India

Indonesia

Japan

Malaysia

Mongolia

Moratorium

Pakistan

Philippines

Republic of Korea

Singapore

Taiwan

Thailand

Article(s)

Alarming levels of executions in few countries – Amnesty

on 27 March 2012

In a new report, Amnesty International analyses some of the key developments in the worldwide application of the death penalty, citing figures it has gathered on the number of death sentences handed down and executions carried out in 2011.

2012

Bahrain

Belarus

China

Iran (Islamic Republic of)

Iraq

Moratorium

Nigeria

Saudi Arabia

Sierra Leone

South Sudan

Tunisia

Article(s)

Asia still top executioner but more divided than ever: Hands Off Cain Report

By Aurélie Plaçais, on 11 August 2011

Hands Off Cain’s 2011 Report contains the most important facts regarding the practice of the death penalty in 2010 and the first six months of 2011.

2011

China

Democratic People's Republic of Korea

Drug Offenses

India

Iran (Islamic Republic of)

Mongolia

Moratorium

Myanmar

Viet Nam

Article(s)

Amnesty 2010 stats: retentionist countries increasingly isolated

on 28 March 2011

Countries which continue to use the death penalty are being left increasingly isolated following a decade of progress towards abolition, Amnesty International has said in its new report Death Sentences and Executions in 2010.

2011

China

Drug Offenses

Egypt

Fair Trial

Indonesia

Iran (Islamic Republic of)

Juveniles

Lao People's Democratic Republic

Libya

Malaysia

Moratorium

Pakistan

Sudan

Thailand

United Arab Emirates

United States

Yemen

Article(s)

Four Japanese executed in China

on 9 April 2010

A Japanese abolitionist organisation has criticised both the Chinese and the Japanese authorities after the series of executions.

2010

China

Drug Offenses

Article(s)

2009 Amnesty statistics: at least 714 executions… excluding China

on 30 March 2010

Amnesty International has released its report on the death penalty in the world in 2009. The organisation has decided to exclude China from its calculation due to the lack of transparency on capital punishment in that country.

2010

Belarus

Burundi

China

Cruel, Inhuman and Degrading Treatment and Punishment

Fair Trial

Iran (Islamic Republic of)

Iraq

Saudi Arabia

Togo

United States

Article(s)

Universal abolition will happen when four key countries change sides

on 28 February 2010

The US, Iran, China and Japan hold a strategic cultural or geographic position, but the road to abolition remains blocked in those countries.

2010

China

Death Row Conditions 

Iran (Islamic Republic of)

Japan

Juveniles

Switzerland

United States

Article(s)

Clever use of online tools could boost activism

on 28 February 2010

Kathy Brown, an English IT specialist, is not the typical anti-death penalty campaigner. She is not an NGO-registered lawyer nor a political science student. But through the internet, she has become active in the global abolitionist community.

China

Drug Offenses

Mental Illness

Article(s)

Abolitionist co-operation at all levels kick-started in Geneva

on 24 February 2010

The first plenary session of the World Congress Against the Death Penalty focused on “increasing cooperation between States, NGOs and international organizations and developing common strategies for a death penalty-free world”.

2010

China

Iran (Islamic Republic of)

Moratorium

Switzerland

Article(s)

Bad press for China after Briton’s execution

on 10 January 2010

Bitter criticism has been targeting China since the execution of British national Akmal Shaikh in the Chinese province of Xinjiang on December 29 after he was found guilty of transporting drugs.

2010

China

Mental Illness

United Kingdom

Article(s)

Chinese death penalty targets minorities

on 19 November 2009

The recent execution of several Uyghurs and Tibetans after ethnic clashes in China was met with severe international criticism.

2009

China

Fair Trial

Legal Representation

Article(s)

China acknowledges death row organ trafficking

on 29 August 2009

The World Coalition and its members have been criticizing illegal organ transplants after executions. Beijing promises to tackle the problem.

2009

China

Cruel, Inhuman and Degrading Treatment and Punishment

Article(s)

Fair and open investigation in Uyghur region

on 21 July 2009

Following the death penalty threats issued against protestors in Xinjiang, the World Coalition calls on China to respect its international committments and to guarantee fair trials.

2009

China

Fair Trial

Article(s)

End the death penalty for drug-related offences

on 26 June 2009

June 26 is a world day of action against drugs. Several international NGOs have joined their voices to condemn the use of capital punishment against drug users and traffickers.

2009

China

Drug Offenses

Indonesia

Viet Nam

Article(s)

World Coalition worried by the current situation in Iraq and Tibet (China)

on 19 May 2009

Alerted by local members, the World Coalition Against the Death Penalty recently sent protest letters to the Chinese and Iraqi authorities.

2009

China

Fair Trial

Iraq

Article(s)

Corpses of doubtful origin banned from Paris exhibition

on 24 April 2009

Two French organisations have won a court case against an exhibition presenting human bodies likely to be those of executed Chinese citizens.

2009

China

Fair Trial

France

France

Article(s)

Amnesty charts death penalty world map and vows to remove Belarus from it

on 25 March 2009

World Coalition member Amnesty International has released its annual statistics on the death penalty and launched a campaign against capital punishment in Belarus.

2009

Belarus

Belarus

China

Iran (Islamic Republic of)

Pakistan

Saudi Arabia

United States

Article(s)

E Book review: a guidebook to the death penalty in Asia

on 10 March 2009

A new, authoritative study sheds a new light on capital punishment across Asia and may help abolitionists enhance their strategies.

2009

China

Japan

Philippines

Republic of Korea

Taiwan

Viet Nam

Document(s)

Executions, Deterrence and Homicide: A Tale of Two Cities

By David T. Johnson / Jeffrey Fagan / Franklin Zimring / Columbia School of Law, on 1 January 2009


2009

Article

China


More details See the document

We compare homicide rates in two quite similar cities with vastly different execution risks. Singapore had an execution rate close to 1 per million per year until an explosive twentyfold increase in 1994-95 and 1996-97 to a level that we show was probably the highest in the world. Hong Kong,has no executions all during the last generation and abolished capital punishment in 1993. Homicide levels and trends are remarkably similar in these two cities over the 35 years after 1973. By comparing two closely matched places with huge contrasts in actual execution but no differences in homicide trends, we have generated a unique test of the exuberant claims of deterrence that have been produced over the past decade in the U.S.

  • Document type Article
  • Countries list China
  • Themes list Deterrence ,

Document(s)

The Next Frontier: National Development, Political Change, and the Death Penalty in Asia

By David T. Johnson / Franklin E. Zimring / Oxford University Press, on 1 January 2009


Book

China


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Authors David Johnson, an expert on law and society in Asia, and Franklin Zimring, a senior authority on capital punishment, utilize their research to identify the critical factors affecting the future of the death penalty in Asia. They found that when an authoritarian state experienced democratic reform, such as in Taiwan and South Korea, the rate of executions dropped sharply. Johnson and Zimring also found that politics, instead of culture or tradition, is the major obstacle to the end of capital punishment in Asia.

  • Document type Book
  • Countries list China

Document(s)

Death Penalty Lessons from Asia

By David T. Johnson / Franklin E. Zimring / Asia-Pacific Journal, on 1 January 2009


Article

China


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Part one of this article summarizes death penalty policy and practice in the region that accounts for 60 percent of the world’s population and more than 90 percent of the world’s executions. The lessons from Asia are then organized into three parts. Part two describes features of death penalty policy in Asia that are consistent with the experiences recorded in Europe and with the theories developed to explain Western changes. Part three identifies some of the most significant diversities within the Asian region – in rates of execution, trends over time, and patterns of change – that contrast with the recent history of capital punishment in non-Asian locations and therefore challenge conventional interpretations of death penalty policy and change. Part four discusses three ways that the politics of capital punishment in Asia are distinctive: the limited role of international standards and transnational influences in most Asian jurisdictions; the presence of single-party domination in several Asian political systems; and the persistence of communist versions of capital punishment in the Asia region.

  • Document type Article
  • Countries list China
  • Themes list Death Penalty,

Document(s)

Criminological analysis on deterrent power of death penalty

By Yuanhuang Zhang / Frontiers of law in China, on 1 January 2009


Article

China

zh-hant
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Death penalty is the most effective deterrence to grave crimes, which has been the key basis for the State to retain death penalty. In fact, either in legislation or in execution, death penalty can not produce the special deterrent effect as expected. With respect to this issue, people tend to conduct normative exploration from the perspective of ordinary legal principles or the principle of human rights, which is more speculative than convincing. Correct interpretation based on the existing positive analysis and differentiation based on human nature which sifts the true from the false will not only help end the simple, repetitive and meaningless arguments regarding the basis for the existence of death penalty, but also help understand the rational nature of both the elimination and the preservation of death penalty, so as to define the basic direction towards which the State should make efforts in controlling death penalty in the context of promoting social civilization.

Article(s)

Filming in the darkness of China’s death row

on 17 September 2008

Night Train, a Chinese film featuring a couple faced with the absurdity of the death penalty, is coming out in DVD.

2008

China

Death Row Conditions 

Article(s)

DVD carries the voice of abolitionists in Asian languages

on 4 August 2008

A DVD released by ADPAN features a campaigning video made from interviews with international anti-death penalty activists in 13 Asian languages.

2008

China

India

Indonesia

Japan

Lao People's Democratic Republic

Mongolia

Pakistan

Philippines

Republic of Korea

Thailand

Viet Nam

Article(s)

Japanese lawyer indignant after her client is executed without notice

on 23 June 2008

On June 17, Tsutomu Miyazaki, Shinji Mutsuda and Yoshio Yamazaki were executed in Japan. Lawyer Maiko Tagusari, who defended one of the three men, denounces the rising number of executions in her country.

2008

China

Japan

Legal Representation

Taiwan

Article(s)

China refuses to consider 250,000-strong petition

on 16 June 2008

A World Coalition delegation found the door closed on June 16 when they attempted to handover to the Chinese Liaison Office in Hong Kong a petition urging for changes in the death penalty system in China.

2008

China

Fair Trial

Innocence

Moratorium

Article(s)

Video: China’s death penalty Olympic medal

on 8 April 2008

French organisation Together Against the Death Penalty seized the opportunity of the Olympic Torch relay in Paris to highlight China’s world record when it comes to executions.

2008

China

France

Article(s)

Top Chinese abolitionist receives threats

on 14 March 2008

The World Coalition Against the Death Penalty (WCADP) is concerned about the security of human rights lawyer, academic and anti-death penalty activist Teng Biao.

2008

China

Fair Trial

Article(s)

Open letter to the China National People’s Congress

on 26 February 2008

The World Coalition and ADPAN are publicising an open letter to the China National People’s Congress demanding concrete steps towards the abolition of the death penalty in China.

2008

China

Fair Trial

Moratorium

Article(s)

Teng Biao: Olympics an opportunity to put pressure on the Chinese authorities”

on 13 February 2008

Teng Biao is one of the rare activists who call for the immediate abolition of the death penalty from within China. In the past weeks, the police confiscated his passport and he received threats.

2008

China

Innocence

Public Opinion 

Article(s)

ADPAN: tearing down Asia’s death penalty veil of secrecy in 2008

on 3 February 2008

The majority of executions take place in Asia. But this is also the continent where campaigners have developed a fantastic regional abolitionist network, one that reaches across borders, languages and religions.

2008

China

Drug Offenses

Fair Trial

Japan

Mental Illness

Mongolia

Murder Victims' Families

Public Opinion 

Republic of Korea

Article(s)

Nie Shubin: a victim of the arbitrary in China

on 21 January 2008

In the lead up to the Beijing Olympics, the French coalition Collectif Chine JO 2008 highlights cases of human rights abuse in China on a weekly basis. This week, they focus on Nie Shubin, who was executed by mistake in 1995.

2008

China

Cruel, Inhuman and Degrading Treatment and Punishment

Women

Document(s)

Against the death penalty: international initiatives and implications

By Richard C. Dieter / Sangmin Bae / Seema Kandelia / William A. Schabas / Lilian Chenwi / Peter Hodgkinson / Roger Hood / Lina Gyllensten / Nicola Machean / Jane Marriott / Julian Killingley / Quincy Whitaker / Jon Yorke (ed) / Ashgate Publishing Limited / Rachael Stokes, on 1 January 2008


2008

Book

China


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This edited volume brings together leading scholars on the death penalty within international, regional and municipal law. It considers the intrinsic elements of both the promotion and demise of the punishment around the world, and provides analysis which contributes to the evolving abolitionist discourse.The contributors consider the current developments within the United Nations, the Council of Europe, the African Commission and the Commonwealth Caribbean, and engage with the emergence of regional norms promoting collective restriction and renunciation of the punishment. They investigate perspectives and questions for retentionist countries, focusing on the United States, China, Korea and Taiwan, and reveal the iniquities of contemporary capital judicial systems. Emphasis is placed on the issues of transparency of municipal jurisdictions, the jurisprudence on the ‘death row phenomenon’ and the changing nature of public opinion. The volume surveys and critiques the arguments used to scrutinize the death penalty to then offer a detailed analysis of possible replacement sanctions.

  • Document type Book
  • Countries list China
  • Themes list International law,

Document(s)

Public Opinion on the Death Penalty in China: Results from a General Population Survey Conducted in Three Provinces in 2007/08

By Shenghui Qi / Dietrich Oberwittler / Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law, on 1 January 2008


Article

China


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The present project is concerned with the significant role that public opinion plays in the debate surrounding the death penalty and criminal policy in the People’s Republic of China, including possible public reaction to any planned abolishment of the death penalty. How is public opinion on the death penalty exhibited in China? What influence does public opinion on the death penalty have on legislative and judicial practice in China? The principal goal of the project is to analyze the links that exist between public opinion, criminal policy, legislation and legal practice, and to initiate attitudinal changes amongst political and legal actors as well as the public at large. A further objective is to guide Chinese criminal law reform, particularly with regard to a possible reduction in the number of capital offences, against the background of the ratification of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights

  • Document type Article
  • Countries list China
  • Themes list Public opinion,

Document(s)

The political origins of death penalty exceptionalism: Mao Zedong and the practice of capital punishment in contemporary China

By Zhang Ning / Punishment and Society, on 1 January 2008


Article

China


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This article focuses on the role played by Mao Zedong in the making of the Chinese communist legal system in general and in the Chinese practice of the death penalty under Mao in particular. It attempts to study this link through an analysis of an event which represented a landmark, namely the campaign of the regression against counterrevolutionaries launched in 1950—2, and through an examination of three specific cases, which enable us to observe the concrete characteristics of these practices, whose effects continue to be felt in today’s China.

  • Document type Article
  • Countries list China
  • Themes list Networks,

Document(s)

The death penalty and society in contemporary China

By Wang Yunhai / Punishment ans Society 10(2), 137-151, on 1 January 2008


Article

China


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Why are death penalty provisions, convictions and executions so prevalent in China? This article aims to answer this question by way of defining China as a ‘state power’ based society characterized by a socialist social system. The prevalence of the death penalty in China can be explained in terms of the following factors: first, the death penalty is a political issue of state power; second, the death penalty is a crucial part of criminal policy in a ‘state power’-based society; third, the issue of whether to retain the death penalty is a political rather than a legal matter. The Chinese government has improved its death penalty system in recent years; however, the situation has not fundamentally changed. The future of death penalty policy and practice in China will depend primarily on legal rather than democratic developments. The death penalty serves as a focal point that can help illuminate issues of punishment and society in East Asia. Accordingly, this article will elaborate my theories regarding the death penalty in contemporary China, with the primary intent of elucidating the relationship between punishment and society in China.

  • Document type Article
  • Countries list China
  • Themes list Networks,

Document(s)

The death penalty in China today: Kill fewer, kill cautiously

By Susan Trevaskes / Asian Survey, on 1 January 2008


Article

China


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While the PRC death penalty debate has been an ongoing and highly contentious issue in the international human rights arena, death sentence policy and practice in China has remained relatively static since the early 1980s. Events in late 2006 and early 2007 have now dramatically changed the landscape of capital punishment in China. This paper analyses the recent debate on the death penalty in terms of the shifting power relationships in China today. The Supreme People’s Court wants to strictly limit the death penalty to only the ‘most heinous’ criminals while the politburo on the other hand, wants to maintain the two-decade old ‘strike hard’ policy which encourages severe punishment to be meted out to a wider range of serious criminals.

  • Document type Article
  • Countries list China
  • Themes list Public debate,

Article(s)

The history of Chinese law is an argument for abolition

on 27 September 2007

In the run-up to the Beijing Olympic Games in 2008, action is increasing to call China to account for its copious use of the death penalty. Far from being a western whim, abolition of capital punishment in China would be a return to an imperial decision made in the 18th century.

2007

Afghanistan

China

Article(s)

8 Demands for Beijing

on 21 June 2007

By welcoming the Olympics in 2008, China committed itself to improving its human rights situation. Anxious to remind Chinese authorities of their commitments, nine French associations, five of which are members of the World Coalition, created the China 2008 Olympic Games Collective.

2007

China

Document(s)

Chinas Death Penalty: History, Law and Contemporary Practices

By Terance D. Miethe / Hong Lu / Routledge, on 1 January 2007


2007

Book

China


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This book examines the death penalty within the changing socio-political context of China. The authors’ treatment of China’s death penalty is legal, historical, and comparative. In particular, they examine; the substantive and procedures laws surrounding capital punishment in different historical periods the purposes and functions of capital punishment in China in various dynasties changes in the method of imposition and relative prevalence of capital punishment over time the socio-demographic profile of the executed and their crimes over the last two decades and comparative practices in other countries. Their analyses of the death penalty in contemporary China focus on both its theory – how it should be done in law – and actual practice – based on available secondary reports/sources.

  • Document type Book
  • Countries list China
  • Themes list Networks,

Document(s)

Capital Punishment Views in China and the United States: A Preliminary Study Among College Students

By Eric G. Lambert / International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology / Shanhe Jiang, on 1 January 2007


Article

China


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There is a lack of research on attitudes toward capital punishment in China, and there is even less research on cross-national comparisons of capital punishment views. Using data recently collected from college students in the United States and China, this study finds that U.S. and Chinese students have differences in their views on the death penalty and its functions of deterrence, rehabilitation, and incapacitation. This study also reveals that the respondents’ perspectives of deterrence, rehabilitation, retribution, and incapacitation all affect their attitudes toward the death penalty in the United States, whereas only the first three views affect attitudes toward capital punishment in China. Furthermore, retribution is the strongest predictor in the United States, whereas deterrence is the strongest predictor in China.

  • Document type Article
  • Countries list China
  • Themes list Public opinion, Public debate,

Document(s)

STRENGTHENING THE DEFENCE IN DEATH PENALTY CASES IN THE PEOPLE´S REPUBLIC OF CHINA: Empirical Research into the Role of Defence Councils in Criminal Cases Eligible for the Death Penalty

By Hans Jörg Albrecht / Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law, on 1 January 2006


2006

Article

China


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This project examines the role of defence councils in Chinese criminal proceedings that can end up with the imposition of the death penalty. It aims to review the problems defence lawyers face in such proceedings, the defence strategies they apply and to examine whether the assignment of a defence lawyer makes a difference in the outcome of a criminal trial. Moreover, the project explores what can and should be done to empower defence councils to effectively represent suspects and accused in death penalty eligible cases.The objective of the study is to shed light on the problems experienced by criminal defence councils when defending capital crime cases and to generate information on how death penalty cases are processed through the Chinese system of justice as well as the determinants of the outcomes death penalty eligible criminal cases.

  • Document type Article
  • Countries list China
  • Themes list Legal Representation,

Document(s)

Sources of Variation in Pro-Death Penalty Attitudes in China: An Exploratory Study of Chinese Students at Home and Abroad

By Lening Zhang / Terance D. Miethe / Hong Lu / Bin Liang / British Journal of Criminology, on 1 January 2006


Article

China


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This paper examines Chinese students’ attitudes about the death penalty in contemporary China. Drawing upon Western public opinion research on the death penalty, samples of Chinese college students at home and abroad are used to explore the magnitude of their pro-death penalty attitudes and sources of variation in these opinions. Both groups of Chinese students are found to support the death penalty across different measures of this concept. Several individual and contextual factors are correlated with pro-death penalty attitudes, but the belief in the specific deterrent effect of punishments was the only variable that had a significant net effect on these attitudes in our multivariate analysis. The paper concludes with a discussion of the implications of this study for future research on public opinion about crime and punishment in China.

  • Document type Article
  • Countries list China
  • Themes list Public opinion, Public debate,

Document(s)

The cultural lives of capital punishment: comparative perspectives

By Sangmin Bae / David T. Johnson / Virgil K.Y. Ho / Evi Girling / Agata Fijalkowski / Julia Eckert / Christian Boulanger / Austin Sarat / Stanford University Press / Botagoz Kassymbekova / Shai Lavi / Jürgen Martschukat, on 1 January 2005


2005

Book

China


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They undertake this “cultural voyage” comparatively—examining the dynamics of the death penalty in Mexico, the United States, Poland, Kyrgyzstan, India, Israel, Palestine, Japan, China, Singapore, and South Korea—arguing that we need to look beyond the United States to see how capital punishment “lives” or “dies” in the rest of the world, how images of state killing are produced and consumed elsewhere, and how they are reflected, back and forth, in the emerging international judicial and political discourse on the penalty of death and its abolition.

  • Document type Book
  • Countries list China
  • Themes list Networks,

Document(s)

The Debate Over the Death Penalty in Today’s China

By Zhang Ning / China perpectives, on 1 January 2005


Article

China


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Despite the sensitivity of the subject, the death penalty is currently a topic of public discussion among Chinese legal experts who are now openly wondering about its possible abolition. This debate is of interest on three counts. First, it goes hand-in-hand with a retrospective reading of the Chinese penal tradition, highlighting the succession of attempts at modernising criminal law for over a century. It also shows the ever present weight of the Maoist legacy and the contradictions of the present policy, caught between a concern for legality and continuing recourse to exceptional measures. Lastly, legal professionals and theorists alike are engaging in a review—based on specific cases—of the particular features of contemporary Chinese society and culture.

  • Document type Article
  • Countries list China
  • Themes list Public debate,

Document(s)

Chinese Executions: Visualising their Differences with European Supplices

By Bourgon J / European Journal of East Asian Studies, on 1 January 2003


2003

Article

China


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European executions obeyed a complex model that the author proposes to call ‘the supplice pattern’. The term supplice designates tortures and tormented executions, but it also includes their cultural background. The European way of executing used religious deeds, aesthetic devices and performing arts techniques which themselves called for artistic representations through paintings, theatre, etc. Moreover, Christian civilisation was unique in the belief that the spectacle of a painful execution had a redemptive effect on the criminals and the attendants as well. Chinese executions obeyed an entirely different conception. They were designed to show that punishment fitted the crime as provided in the penal code. All details were aimed to highlight and inculcate the meaning of the law, while signs of emotions, deeds, words, that could have interfered with the lesson in law were prohibited. In China, capital executions were not organized as a show nor subject to aesthetic representations, and they had no redemptive function. This matter-of-fact way of executing people caused Westerners deep uneasiness. The absence of religious background and staging devices was interpreted as a sign of barbarity and cruelty. What was stigmatised was not so much the facts that their failure to conform to the ‘supplice pattern’ that constituted for any Westerner the due process of capital executions.

  • Document type Article
  • Countries list China
  • Themes list Networks,